• Stop Union Busting in the Electronics Industry
    The ability for workers to form, join and organise within a trade union is a fundamental human right. It is also vital in order for workers to negotiate with management for better pay and conditions. Studies have shown that "union representation is generally very low and corporate resistance to unionisation is widespread" within the electronics industry. Companies involved in the manufacture of electronics have been found making deliberate attempts to stop the establishment of unions in their factories. Tactics they have used include preventing unions communicating with workers, subjecting union members to discrimination, dismissal, intimidation or violence, and establishing "paper" unions which do not represent the interests of workers but are built to create an illusion of unionisation. A 2016 report by the ITUC found that Samsung has engaged in union busting practices. The ITUC General Secretary Sharon Burrow argued "From the top of its supply chain down, Samsung prohibits the formation of unions". But the problem isn't unique to Samsung. Lack of union representation is endemic within the electronics industry. Stand in solidarity with electronics workers across the world, and support their right to union representation!
    1,423 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Chris Jarvis
  • Drop the Word 'Illegal' to Describe Migrants
    The term 'illegal' is the most common precursor to the word 'migrant' in the media. There are a myriad of reasons why that is both an inaccurate and a harmful word to be using. It is legally incorrect, misleading, ignores international legal obligations and violates the principle of due process. It also criminalises and dehumanises people, preventing fair discussion, threatening solidarity and costing lives. It shouldn't be the role of journalists to embrace the narratives of political parties that scapegoat migrants. As one of the oldest newspapers in the country, we believe that the Yorkshire Post can do better. Here are a few quotes from young refugees and asylum seekers speaking on how the label ‘illegal’ made them feel: “It makes me feel like I’m a dangerous weapon to society. If I carry a firearm, it’s illegal. It’s like you’re saying migrant is synonymous with firearm” - Prakesh, young migrant “You feel it in everyday life, I’m not considered a human being like everyone else, the media is the source to creating all of this in the public eye” - Zahra, young migrant “It makes you feel like you don’t belong in society” - Priya, young migrant
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    Created by Chris Jarvis
  • Cambridge University, listen to your members and divest from fossil fuels
    The democratic will of the University could not be clearer. Regent House, the University’s governing body and “the embodiment of the University as a democratic institution”, passed a grace committing the University to full divestment. Time and time again, academics have voiced their concerns. Student support has been unequivocal - CUSU Council voted unanimously for divestment in November 2017, with the Graduate Union also voting to express its support. JCRs at Christ’s, Peterhouse, Newnham, King’s, Magdalene, Sidney Sussex, Emmanuel, Selwyn and Churchill have all passed motions in favour of divestment. We believe that a University should listen to its members, rather than disregard their opinions. As vice-chancellor Stephen Toope said himself, climate change is the most important ethical issue of our age. Since 2008, an average of 26.4 million people per year have been displaced from their homes by disasters brought on by natural hazards. This is the equivalent to one person being displaced every second. Yet fossil fuel companies show no signs of changing their destructive practices. Their current reserves of oil, coal, and gas contain five times as much carbon as can ever be safely burned if we are to avoid runaway climate catastrophe. With an endowment of £6.3 billion, of which an estimated £377 million is invested in fossil fuels, as well as internationally respected reputation, Cambridge University has a unique opportunity to send the message that we cannot keep funding climate change. Stephen Toope said that he wanted the University to be a “social leader” – divestment is the chance to fulfil that aspiration, and commit to a future that is sustainable, ethical, and committed to climate justice. More than 60 universities across the UK have already committed to divestment, with Bristol, Durham and Edinburgh doing so in the past few months alone. The City of New York and World Bank have also announced they will divest, and for good reason: one Oxford Smith School study said that divestment movements had achieved legislative success in “almost every” historical case. As these examples, as well as a Cambridge Zero Carbon Society report from January 2018, illustrate, there are many different ways in which the University could go about divesting. We urge Cambridge to respond to the will of its staff and students, and join the ranks of institutions across the world in divesting from fossil fuels.
    1,301 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Zero Carbon Cambridge
  • Sweatshop Free @ Brighton University
    To quell the human rights abuses that are happening in factories likely producing the electronics that us students use. We have the privilege of having the swaying power to end issues like this through our institution, while those making our electronics barely have a voice to protect their rights to a life worth living.
    29 of 100 Signatures
    Created by People and Planet Brighton
  • Make Surrey's Tech Ethical
    Every year, billions of pounds are spent by public bodies in the UK and Ireland on ICT equipment including phones, laptops, computers and tablets. Workers that made them likely spent excessively long hours working in dangerous factories. Some are at risk of developing cancer from toxic chemical exposure, which also pollutes the environment. Many sweatshop workers experience violence and are at risk of modern slavery. Electronics Watch is an independent labour monitoring organisation for the electronic industry. Electronics Watch members are public bodies who are coming together to use their collective influence over the industry to improve working conditions in factories across the globe. When joining, institutions write human and labour rights guarantees into their contracts with suppliers. Electronics Watch conducts monitoring of factories on behalf of its members, reporting back about conditions and treatment of works. They then negotiate with global brands, manufacturing companies and factory owners to address any labour rights violations that have been found. Our money is being spent on these products and we're demanding that money be used to eradicate rather than perpetuate a system based on exploitation of workers and inhumane conditions!
    155 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Nicholas Werren
  • UEA University - David Richardson Go Sweatshop Free - Join Electronics Watch
    Every year, billions of pounds are spent by public bodies in the UK and Ireland on ICT equipment including phones, laptops, computers and tablets. Workers that made them likely spent excessively long hours working in dangerous factories. Some are at risk of developing cancer from toxic chemical exposure, which also pollutes the environment. Many sweatshop workers experience violence and are at risk of modern slavery. Electronics Watch is an independent labour monitoring organisation for the electronic industry. Electronics Watch members are public bodies who are coming together to use their collective influence over the industry to improve working conditions in factories across the globe. When joining, institutions write human and labour rights guarantees into their contracts with suppliers. Electronics Watch conducts monitoring of factories on behalf of its members, reporting back about conditions and treatment of works. They then negotiate with global brands, manufacturing companies and factory owners to address any labour rights violations that have been found. Our money is being spent on these products and we're demanding that money be used to eradicate rather than perpetuate a system based on exploitation of workers and inhumane conditions!
    6 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Jarvis
  • Oxford Brookes University, Go Sweatshop Free - Join Electronics Watch
    Every year, billions of pounds are spent by public bodies in the UK and Ireland on ICT equipment including phones, laptops, computers and tablets. Workers that made them likely spent excessively long hours working in dangerous factories. Some are at risk of developing cancer from toxic chemical exposure, which also pollutes the environment. Many sweatshop workers experience violence and are at risk of modern slavery. Electronics Watch is an independent labour monitoring organisation for the electronic industry. Electronics Watch members are public bodies who are coming together to use their collective influence over the industry to improve working conditions in factories across the globe. When joining, institutions write human and labour rights guarantees into their contracts with suppliers. Electronics Watch conducts monitoring of factories on behalf of its members, reporting back about conditions and treatment of works. They then negotiate with global brands, manufacturing companies and factory owners to address any labour rights violations that have been found. Our money is being spent on these products and we're demanding that money be used to eradicate rather than perpetuate a system based on exploitation of workers and inhumane conditions!
    359 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Jenny Jensvold
  • Bath University Go Sweatshop Free
    Every year, billions of pounds are spent by public bodies in the UK and Ireland on ICT equipment including phones, laptops, computers and tablets. Workers that made them likely spent excessively long hours working in dangerous factories. Some are at risk of developing cancer from toxic chemical exposure, which also pollutes the environment. Many sweatshop workers experience violence and are at risk of modern slavery. Electronics Watch is an independent labour monitoring organisation for the electronic industry. Electronics Watch members are public bodies who are coming together to use their collective influence over the industry to improve working conditions in factories across the globe. When joining, institutions write human and labour rights guarantees into their contracts with suppliers. Electronics Watch conducts monitoring of factories on behalf of its members, reporting back about conditions and treatment of works. They then negotiate with global brands, manufacturing companies and factory owners to address any labour rights violations that have been found. Our money is being spent on these products and we're demanding that money be used to eradicate rather than perpetuate a system based on exploitation of workers and inhumane conditions!
    83 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Lucy Griffiths
  • Sussex University: Go Sweatshop Free - Join Electronics Watch
    Every year, billions of pounds are spent by public bodies in the UK and Ireland on ICT equipment including phones, laptops, computers and tablets. Workers that made them likely spent excessively long hours working in dangerous factories. Some are at risk of developing cancer from toxic chemical exposure, which also pollutes the environment. Many sweatshop workers experience violence and are at risk of modern slavery. Electronics Watch is an independent labour monitoring organisation for the electronic industry. Electronics Watch members are public bodies who are coming together to use their collective influence over the industry to improve working conditions in factories across the globe. When joining, institutions write human and labour rights guarantees into their contracts with suppliers. Electronics Watch conducts monitoring of factories on behalf of its members, reporting back about conditions and treatment of works. They then negotiate with global brands, manufacturing companies and factory owners to address any labour rights violations that have been found. There has been discussion around Electronics Watch at Sussex for a while now. In 2016, SU officers spoke to senior management about Electronics Watch and in December 2017 Sussex staff attended an Electronics Watch Conference to find out more about the organisation. However, the University still hasn't signed up. We're asking the university to step up and join Electronics Watch because our money is being spent on these electronic products. We're demanding that money be used to eradicate rather than perpetuate a system based on exploitation of workers and inhumane conditions!
    161 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Martha Knott
  • Cardiff University Boycott Barclays
    We cannot afford to construct any new infrastructure which relies on fossil fuel extraction. We cannot dig any new coal mines, drill any new oil fields, build any more pipelines. Yet right now, projected investment in new fields, mines, and transportation infrastructure over the next twenty years is worth $14 trillion. Barclays is a major investor in fossil fuel infrastructure across the globe it's time for them to halt their support for the fossil fuel industry before they crash the climate.
    10 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Saltmarsh
  • Imperial College London Boycott Barclays
    We cannot afford to construct any new infrastructure which relies on fossil fuel extraction. We cannot dig any new coal mines, drill any new oil fields, build any more pipelines. Yet right now, projected investment in new fields, mines, and transportation infrastructure over the next twenty years is worth $14 trillion. Barclays is a major investor in fossil fuel infrastructure across the globe it's time for them to halt their support for the fossil fuel industry before they crash the climate.
    16 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Saltmarsh
  • University of Nottingham Boycott Barclays
    We cannot afford to construct any new infrastructure which relies on fossil fuel extraction. We cannot dig any new coal mines, drill any new oil fields, build any more pipelines. Yet right now, projected investment in new fields, mines, and transportation infrastructure over the next twenty years is worth $14 trillion. Barclays is a major investor in fossil fuel infrastructure across the globe it's time for them to halt their support for the fossil fuel industry before they crash the climate.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Saltmarsh